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SARAMENTO – The No on Prop 23 campaign announced the launch of its statewide voter education campaign today. The new television ad features Janet Gross, a dialysis patient from Mission Hills, California. The ad will begin airing statewide on Sept. 16 and is running on broadcast, cable and digital platforms.   

“I spent 50 years in the music business. I’ve got stories I can’t repeat. I’d still be there if I hadn’t gotten sick,” says Janet Gross in the ad. “Yes I’m on dialysis, but there are worse things in life.

“One special interest group, again, is putting my life at risk. And Prop 23 could shut down my clinic.

“I’m not going to die from dialysis. I’m going to die without it.

She concludes, “Prop 23 is dangerous. Please vote no.”

Prop 23 is the special interest proposition that would force dialysis clinics in California to cutback services or close, seriously jeopardizing access to care for tens of thousands of vulnerable dialysis patients. It will also make our state’s physician shortage and ER overcrowding worse, all while increasing health care costs by hundreds of millions annually. That’s why it is opposed by more than 100 groups including the California Medical Association, American Nurses Association\California, NAACP California, Latino Diabetes Association, Dialysis Patient Citizens, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Department of California and many others.

Every daily newspaper in California that has weighed in thus far is opposed to Prop 23.

There are approximately 80,000 dialysis patients in California with failed kidneys who need machines to clean their blood and remove toxins from their bodies. Patients must receive dialysis treatment three times a week for four hours at a time to stay alive. Access to consistent dialysis treatments is so important that just one missed treatment increases patients’ risk of death by 30%.

Prop 23 is sponsored by the United Healthcare Workers West (UHW) union – the same organization that abused California’s initiative process two years ago by bankrolling Proposition 8 on the 2018 ballot. Prop 8 was rejected by voters by 20 points.

While unions have the right to try to unionize workers, it’s not right to abuse the initiative system and use vulnerable patients as political pawns – especially now in the face of a public health crisis.

Please visit NoProp23.com for more information.